Should You Jump on the Social Activism Bandwagon? How?
Agile marketing strategies aided by Martech is bound to help marketers adopt the right brand activism! This piece on Social Activism explores the aspect deeply.

Agile marketing strategies aided by Martech is bound to help marketers adopt the right brand activism! This piece on Social Activism explores the aspect deeply.

Facebook ad boycotts, alignment with #BlackLivesMatter, ditching names like Aunt Jemima: social activism is the latest must-have for brands.

But should you jump on the bandwagon? And how do you make the shift without getting labeled as inauthentic, especially if your brand has never talked about these issues before?

Now is the time to speak up, but brand activism is a significant strategic shift, not just a one-time change in temporary tactics. You need to address and master that realignment so you’re not just fast to fail in this emerging space.

Even more importantly, by doing brand activism right, we as marketers have a chance at helping achieve lasting change from these times of upheaval.

Agile ways of working have long recognized that we often exert the majority of our planning energies at the moment of maximum ignorance. We create perfect strategy documents that assume nothing will change for months, or even years, as we go about our business and get work done.

That’s almost never true in the world of marketing, but it’s even less true than usual in 2020.

Fortunately, the agile mindset, and the frameworks that help us put it into practice, offer an alternative way towards meaningful brand activism that allows us to make a lasting connection with the causes that resonate with both our brands and our customers.

Agile Marketers Still Need a Strategy

I once read an article purporting to be about agile marketing that wondered, “Can you plan to be agile? Isn’t that cheating?” There’s a strangely persistent myth that being agile means you react to what’s going on around you in real-time, irrespective of any plan or strategy.

That’s not only inaccurate, it’s a terrible idea for marketers who are expected to be stewards of brand health over the long term.

The bottom line is that strategy matters even when you’re responding to sudden change.


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